fbpx
Yoga For High Blood Pressure

Yoga For High Blood Pressure

A common condition in which the long-term force of the blood on your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease, is high blood pressure (also known as hypertension) (1).

The pressure imposed by circulating blood on the walls of blood arteries is known as blood pressure (BP). The amount of blood your heart pumps and the response to blood flow in your arteries influence your blood pressure. Blood pressure rises with increased heart rate and artery narrowing. A blood pressure reading is in mmHg (mm Hg).

There are two measurements of blood pressure: systolic and diastolic, which are the maximum and minimum pressures.

  • Systolic pressure – With each beat of your heart, the pressure in your arteries increases. The first, or upper, number indicates how much pressure is in your arteries.
  • Diastolic pressure – When you get your heart rate, the second number tells you how much pressure there is in your arteries between beats.

Systolic blood pressure should be less than 120mmHg and diastolic pressure less than 80mmHg for adults.

While sleeping, exercising, or feeling excited or worried, it is common for blood pressure to fluctuate. During physical exertion, the BP is expected to rise. It is common for blood pressure to rise as we get older and heavier. While low blood pressure in infants is considered normal, older teens’ BP is more in line with that of adults. However, as soon as the exercise is stopped, the blood pressure recovers to its regular baseline level (2).

Since the 1990s, the prevalence of hypertension and prehypertension among adolescents has increased. One billion people throughout the world have hypertension. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in India, and high blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the most important modifiable risk factors that may be controlled (3).

This article contains 32 Yoga poses that can help alleviate high blood pressure. It also contains 3 pranayama (breathing exercises), sun salutation, and meditation technique that can help with High Blood Pressure.

Table of Contents

    How Yoga can help with High Blood Pressure

    Yoga is an ancient Indian science. It modifies your body in a predictable way and is backed by around the world, scientists suggest Yoga promotes longevity, has therapeutic and rehabilitative effects. Yoga has also been shown to reduce systolic blood pressure. Aging is unavoidable in all systems. Age lowers the efficacy of cardiovascular regulating mechanisms (baroreceptor reflex activity). Yoga may reduce anxiety levels, lowering blood pressure. Numerous longitudinal yoga research in various age groups found similar outcomes. Long-term yoga practice reduces systolic and diastolic BP by reducing sympathetic tone and peripheral response (4).

    Yoga is a great alternative to high blood pressure medication

    Research shows that hypertension can be managed without the use of medication. There are other ways to lower blood pressure besides exercising, such as aerobics, Zumba dancing, and yoga, which are all effective. They aid in the reduction of cardiovascular disease-related mortality and morbidity. It was discovered that participants who practised yoga had the biggest drop in blood pressure, followed by those who performed Zumba dancing and finally among people who participated in aerobics, when these three activities were compared. As long as the medication interventions are used for short periods of time, there are no negative side effects from any of the three activities. As a result, they provide a more effective way to deal with stressful or anxious situations. Thus, it forms part of primary care in preventing hypertension and related disorders. For people with hypertension, daily practise of yoga is an excellent alternative to medication and can help them overcome their condition early on, boosting preventive care (5).

    Yoga can help elderly people balance their blood pressure

    Practicing yoga can help the elderly maintain healthy blood pressure. Exercises such as yoga can help the elderly keep their blood pressure in check. Breathing techniques, relaxation, and the pattern of mild movements can all be used safely in yoga for the elderly. Practicing yoga’s fundamental movements can lower blood pressure in the elderly, allowing them to carry out their daily activities to the best of their abilities. As a non-pharmacological technique for enhancing efforts to treat hypertension in the elderly, yoga practices can be employed without side effects as a supplementary therapy. There are no known negative effects associated with using this non-pharmacological treatment for hypertension. The findings of this study should be utilized as a basis for further research in this sector and for the creation of clinical recommendations for the use of therapy in the social care facility (6).

    Yoga can aid people with mild to moderate hypertension to prevent heart disease

    Yoga has been shown to be useful in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate hypertension. According to the study, participants practiced yoga for one hour every day for three months. During the course of the trial, the participants experienced lower blood pressure, lower blood glucose levels, lower cholesterol levels, and lower triglycerides levels, as well as higher subjective well-being and higher quality of life. As a result, yoga has the potential to have a significant role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in people with mild to moderate hypertension (7).

    HIV-infected people are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is critical to developing safe and effective HIV CVD prevention treatments. Research on the yoga group showed greater improvement in resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures than in the standard of care group. However, there was no larger reduction in body weight, fat mass, or proatherogenic lipids after yoga, nor were there any changes in glucose tolerance or general quality of life following the practice. The immune and virological statuses of the participants were unaffected. As a result of this, Yoga reduced both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in another group of people who were at risk for cardiovascular disease after 20 weeks of participation. Yoga is a low-cost, simple-to-administer, nonpharmacological, and widely popular behavioral intervention that has been shown to reduce blood pressure in pre-hypertensive HIV-infected persons with mild-moderate CVD risk factors (8).

    Yoga tends to help patients with coronary artery disease regulate their BP

    Hypertension is a severe issue in the community. Yoga with a minimum of 10 minutes of sun salutation postures may provide some percentage of adequately intensive physical exercise to improve cardio-respiratory fitness in CAD patients.

    Getting absolute mental quiet in all forty-nine subconscious departments of the mind is difficult, demanding, arduous, and strenuous. Being captives to the intellect prevents us from experiencing true happiness. This study shows that yoga training increases cardiac vagal regulation in healthy yoga practitioners. Being simple to use, with no negative side effects, and resulting in deep physical as well as psychological relaxation, this strategy may be a useful intervention during cardiac rehabilitation to shift the autonomic balance in favor of increased vagal activity and, as a result, reduce cardiac mortality. Whether therapeutic yoga’s favorable effect on cardiac vagal modulation can be applied to patients with heart disease and integrated into cardiac rehabilitation programs requires more research (9).

    Yoga Poses, Breathing Exercises for High Blood Pressure

    Meditation (Dhyana)

    Meditation

    Meditation techniques are becoming increasingly popular as a means of preventing or decreasing high blood pressure (11).

    How To Practice

    1. In order to practice dhyana, one must sit with a straight and erect spine and direct one’s attention to anything, such as the sound of the letter OM (the famous mantra).
    2. The practice of Dhyana should be done for around eight to ten minutes at the start, and then extended according to one’s ability.

    Pranayam

    Pranayama can rejuvenate, regenerate, and reenergize the whole body. The stress hormone cortisol is reduced by conscious breathing. Extended pranayama can reduce the heart rate. Short-term regular pranayama and meditation practise revealed favourable effects, with substantial reductions in heart rate, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure (RABP). Pranayama has been demonstrated to reduce blood pressure and heart rate (10, 12).

    Ujjayi Breathing (Victorious Breathing)

    Ujjayi Breathing (Victorious Breathing)

    Ujjayi Breathing is referred to be the victorious breath in some circles.

    The mouth is closed, and the throat is squeezed, as if by a vice. On the exhale, the breath is accompanied by a hissing or faint snoring sound as the air flows over the soft palate that has been lifted.

    How To Practice

    1. Close your mouth and tighten your throat (the glottis, a component of the larynx).
    2. Breathe out for a few seconds, then gently and rhythmically begin to inhale for a long and uninterrupted inspiration.
    3. Make a “friction sound” by allowing air to travel through a constricting throat.
    4. Continue inhaling until your chest feels completely filled.
    5. Inhale the air for six seconds, then exhale it (preferably double the period of inspiration).
    6. Sit with your spine, head, and neck straight.
    7. The muscles of the face and the nose are not tensed. Inhalation is long, uninterrupted, and quick-free.
    8. Taking care not to make any quick or fast motions, slowly exhale.
    9. Relax by taking a few deep breaths.

    Kapalabhati (Breath Of Fire)

    Kapalabhati (Breath Of Fire)

    Kapalabhati is a type of breathing exercise that is also used as a purifying technique. Slowly progress through this pranayam. It not only lowers blood pressure but also cures other chronic disorders.

    How To Practice

    1. To begin, sit cross-legged on the floor. Sit up straight and firmly.
    2. Your hands should be placed on your knees, with palms facing upward, to begin. If you put your palm on your tummy while you’re breathing, you’ll be able to feel the rise in your stomach.
    3. Feel your tummy expand as you inhale through your nose.
    4. Exhale through your nostrils while tightening your abdominal muscles, without pausing. Inhale and exhale at the same rate. Repeat till you feel at ease with it.
    5. Continue to inhale passively and exhale strongly in sync with the beat. To hone your skills, repeat multiple times.
    6. Increase the rate at which you inhale and exhale now. Powerful and audible exhalations are a must.
    7. For the next 30 seconds, keep repeating this procedure.
    8. Try doing Breath of Fire for longer as you get better.

    Anuloma Viloma (Alternate Nostril Breathing)

    Anuloma Viloma (Alternate Nostril Breathing)

    Anuloma Viloma is a breathing technique that uses alternative nostrils. The practice of Anulom-Vilom purifies blood arteries and veins, making the three main nadis the Idaa, Pingla and Sushumna more flexible. It helps to boost mental and physical strength, which lowers the chance of developing high blood pressure.

    How To Practice

    1. Sit in a meditative pose like Sukhasana or Padmasana. A straight spine is ideal.
    2. Close the nostrils using the right thumb and fourth (ring) finger on the right hand.
    3. With the right nostril closed, take a deep breath out through the left nostril, followed by a deep breath in through the right nostril.
    4. When you exhale and inhale via your right nostril, the left nostril is closed to keep the breath from escaping.
    5. Continue as much as possible. Practice increasing inhale and exhalation numbers.
    6. Try to keep equal counts for inhalation, expiration, and suspension of the breath while holding it twice as long.

    Sun Salutation

    The Sun Salutation yoga practice will significantly lower your resting heart rate and blood pressure. It will also significantly improve flexibility, upper body muscle endurance, and how you feel about yourself.

    Sun Salutation (Astanga Yoga’s)

    Sun Salutation  (Astanga Yoga's)

    Surya Namaskar is an excellent Ashtanga yoga practise that may be performed by beginners as well as more experienced practitioners. It is an excellent method to begin your yogic journey or to deepen your practise.

    How To Practice

    1. Start by standing with your feet together and your arms at your sides (Mountain Posture)
    2. Exhale while raising the arms above the head with the palms together.
    3. Take a deep breath and bend forward, placing the palms of the hands near to the heels of the feet.
    4. Take a deep breath in and elevate your head forward and straighten your back.
    5. Exhale while jumping the feet back to a push-up position with the feet elevated slightly off the floor on the exhale (Four-Limbed Stick Posture)
    6. Inhale, tuck practice the feet under, and straighten the arms to bring the body into a balanced position in the backbend position. The weight is supported by the tops (dorsal surfaces) of the feet and the palms of the hands (Upward-Facing Dog)
    7. Take a deep breath, curl your toes under, and elevate your hips to the ceiling. It’s as though the body is in an upside-down “V.” (Downward-Facing Dog). Take five deep breaths and hold them.
    8. Jump your feet to your hands while taking a deep breath. Then lift your head forward and straighten your back.
    9. With an exhale, lean forward and place the palms of your hands beside your feet.
    10. Exhale while raising the arms above the head with the palms together.
    11. Take a deep breath and bring the arms back to the sides (Mountain Posture).

    Sun Salutation B (Hatha Yoga)

    Sun Salutation B (Hatha Yoga)

    According to traditional Hatha Yoga, the Surya Namaskar is performed in order to salute the Lord Sun.

    How To Practice

    1. Standing with the feet together and hands pressed together in front of the chest is a good starting point.
    2. Inhale deeply, arch your back, and raise your arms above your head.
    3. Take a deep breath and bend forward, placing your hands on the floor.
    4. Take a deep breath and bring the right leg back into a lunge.
    5. Maintain your breath and step the left leg back into a push-up pose on the other side.
    6. Take a deep breath and bring your knees, chin, and chest to the floor.
    7. With each exhalation, lower the hips to the floor and raise the head and shoulders off the floor.
    8. Take a deep breath, curl the toes under, and press the hips to the ceiling
    9. Take a deep breath in as you lift your right leg up between your hands into a lunge.
    10. Exhale, move the left leg forward, rest the palms of the hands on the floor, and lower the head to the level of the knees
    11. Take a deep breath and lift your arms above your head, arching your spine.
    12. Return the arms to their original positions.

    The sun salutation is complete when you repeat the full pattern, starting with the left leg.

    Yoga Poses

    Yoga, when practiced mindfully, can help alleviate a particular type of stress-induced hypertension while treating its underlying causes. As well as calming the sympathetic nervous system and lowering the pulse rate, it also helps people learn to relax their muscles and minds completely (10).

    Cat-Cow Pose (Bitilasana Marjaryasana)

    Cat-Cow Pose (Bitilasana Marjaryasana)

    This is a therapeutic pose for people who suffer from high blood pressure. It may help to promote digestion and quiet the brain, while also stretching the spine, shoulders, and backs of the legs.

    How To Practice

    1. Get on your knees and place your palms on the floor, aligning the palms and knees.
    2. Inhale and elevate the neck, chest, spine, and tailbone.
    3. Exhale and pull the shoulder blades apart, bringing the chin down and in. The spine travels inwards and outwards in response to the movement of the breath, with the help of the shoulders and wrists.
    4. Do 12 cycles of inhalation and exhalation. To better massage your internal organs, keep an eye out for the lower abdomen stretch.
    5. If holding this pose for a long time is challenging, use blankets below the knees and palms for support.

    Child’s pose (Balasana)

    Child's pose (Balasana)

    Patients suffering from hypertension will benefit from the child posture. It has the potential to provide relief from a variety of variables that lead to high blood pressure. Reduces tension and promotes blood circulation throughout the body, making this a beneficial pose.

    How To Practice

    1. Inhale deeply as you spread your knees hip-width apart.
    2. With your chest resting between your thighs and hands swinging front, bend forward and exhale as you perform this movement.
    3. Maintain this position for two to three minutes.
    4. Finally, take a deep breath and slowly return to your starting posture.

    Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

    Downward-Facing Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana)

    Downward-facing dog pose increases overall body strength, particularly in the arms, legs, and feet, as well as in the core. This yoga pose can help you enhance your immune system and may prevent elevated high blood pressure.

    How To Practice

    1. Stand on your four limbs, which are your arms and your knees, and count to ten.
    2. While inhaling, keep your toes firmly planted on the floor and lift your knees off the floor. Maintain a straight line between your elbows and knees.
    3. Then, while keeping your upper body slanted towards the front, extend your arms forward to the side.
    4. Lift your hips as high as you possibly can in order to create an inverted V shape in your body.
    5. While stretching your neck, press your arms into the floor and maintain your inner arms in contact with your ears as you press your arms into the floor.
    6. Now turn your sight inwards and focus on your novel.
    7. Hold the position for a few seconds, then lower your torso and knees to return to the starting position. Repeat the same on the other side.

    Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana)

    Bridge Pose (Setu Bandhasana)

    Bridge posture regulates BP. Mentally, it reduces tension & also helps with mild depression. Aside from lowering high blood pressure, bridge posture is beneficial for the abdominal organs, lungs, menstruation discomfort, exhaustion, headache, and anxiety, among other things.

    How To Practice

    1. First, take a deep breath and relax in Shavasana or a supine position.
    2. It is best if your arms are on the sides of your thighs.
    3. Now, fold your knees and grip your ankles together with your palms facing each other.
    4. The spacing between the feet should be at least 10 inches in length and width.
    5. As you inhale, elevate your back as comfortably as you possibly can in a calm manner.
    6. Raising the heels allows one to be on their toes as well. Increased back and neck stretching is achieved through this exercise.
    7. Maintain the pose for at least 30 seconds, taking calm inhalations and exhalations throughout.
    8. Relax your back by taking a big exhale and taking some time to yourself.
    9. This procedure should be repeated 3 to 5 times.

    Lunge Pose Yoga (Utthita Ashwa sanchalanasana)

    Lunge Pose Yoga (Utthita Ashwa sanchalanasana)

    Utthita Ashwa Sanchalanasana stretches the legs, arms, and chest muscles deeply. It opens the hips and groins and elongates the spine. This increases muscle size and flexibility. In all movements, regular breathing increases oxygen and nutrients to the muscles. It gradually builds muscle.

    How To Practice

    1. Pose yourself in a downward dog position.
    2. Exhale, bringing your right foot in between your palms.
    3. As you inhale, raise your body and open your arms wide to the sides while keeping your left leg strong.
    4. With palms facing each other, raise them above your head.
    5. In order to reach back through the left heel, you should press your tailbone toward the floor.
    6. Stay focused on your thumbs while looking up.
    7. Feel the stretch in your lower back ribs as you hold the pose with your arms lifted.
    8. For 30 seconds, hold the pose.
    9. Breathe out and let your torso fall forward until it touches your front thigh.
    10. The hands should be placed on the floor once more.
    11. Inhale, then exhale and bring your right foot back to down dog position.
    12. After taking a few deep breaths, step your left foot forward and repeat the same motion.

    Reclining Big Toe Pose (Supta Padangusthasana)

    Reclining Big Toe Pose (Supta Padangusthasana)

    This pose is beneficial for people who have flat feet or have high blood pressure since it helps to relax the muscles.

    How To Practice

    1. Take a deep breath and slowly arch your back.
    2. Lift your right leg toward your chest as you take a deep breath in. Only if your spine remains neutral can you reach the inside of your big toe.
    3. The foot can be flexed by exhaling and drawing your left toes towards your shin. Place your left knee on the mat and squeeze it firmly.
    4. Engage your quads and force the heel upward as you inhale to lengthen your knee. Allow your leg to elongate toward the sky.
    5. As you exhale, bring your shoulders down to the mat and connect with the floor underneath you.
    6. Hold this position for 5 to 10 calm breaths.
    7. After inhaling, release the toe while maintaining a straight leg, and then exhale. Release your extended arm and leg to the floor as you exhale. Repeat the process on the other end.

    Standing forward bend (Uttanasana)

    Standing forward bend (Uttanasana)

    It is a head-to-toe pose that is performed while standing. Gravity and the downward motion of the body assist in the blood circulation in this challenging stretch pose.

    How To Practice

    1. Make a stand like a mountain (Tadasana). At the top of the yoga mat, stand with feet hip-width apart.
    2. Take a deep breath in, then slowly fold your torso inward.
    3. Reach down with your fingers and touch the floor.
    4. Inhale, then exhale via the nose and mouth.
    5. Rise slowly on an inhalation.

    Happy Baby Pose (Ananda Balasana)

    Happy Baby Pose (Ananda Balasana)

    This pose is very good for persons who suffer from high blood pressure issues.

    How To Practice

    1. On your back, find a neutral spine position with natural curves but not excessive.
    2. Bring your knees close. Maintain your hip sockets supple as you raise your legs but keep your hips down. Keep your neutral spine on the mat.
    3. Flex your feet and point the soles upwards.
    4. Pull your big toes down with your first two fingers. As you relax, your knees will come closer to your chest as your hips release. Bring your hands up to the outside of the foot and grab the arch.
    5. Slow down and inhale deeply. Enjoy the hamstring stretch.
    6. Let your back relax into the floor; don’t force it; simply let it go. Baby, try to be as cheerful as possible.

    Sitting Half Spinal Twist (Ardha Matsyendrasana)

    Sitting Half Spinal Twist (Ardha Matsyendrasana)

    This asana promotes the flexibility of the spine and expands the chest to boost the supply of oxygen. Among other things, it aids in the treatment of slipped discs and improves blood flow throughout the body.

    How To Practice

    1. Keep your feet together and your spine straight while sitting upright with your legs spread out straight in front of you.
    2. Straighten out the left leg and press the left heel towards the right hip (optionally, you can keep the left leg straight).
    3. Cross the left knee with the right leg.
    4. To begin, place the left hand on the right knee and the right hand in front of you while keeping your back straight.
    5. Look over the right shoulder as you rotate your waist, shoulders, and neck to the right in this manner.
    6. Maintain a straight spine.
    7. Hold for a few moments and then take a few more slow, deep breaths in and out.
    8. Releasing the right hand first (the hand behind you), then the waist, chest and finally the neck, sit up relaxed but still straight while breathing out.
    9. Afterwards, switch sides and repeat the process.
    10. Exhale and relax your body by returning to the front.

    Hero pose (Virasana)

    Hero pose (Virasana)

    This basic asana is a great approach to reducing excessive blood pressure. It helps to open up the chest and enables proper blood flow throughout the body.

    How To Practice

    1. Lay down on the ground with your hands on your knees.
    2. Kneel closer to each other and relax your muscles.
    3. Slowly drop your hips to sit on the mat.
    4. Place your feet flat on the floor.
    5. Keep your feet on the ground and pointed outward.
    6. Hold the position for 30 seconds at first, then progressively extend the time.
    7. It’s just one round. Do 2 to 3 rounds as you feel comfortable.

    Upward Salute (Urdhva Hastasana)

    Upward Salute (Urdhva Hastasana)

    Urdhva Hastasana extends the sides, spine, shoulders, armpits, and stomach. It aids digestion, reduces anxiety and exhaustion, and tones the thighs. Asthma and congestion might benefit from the clearing of the chest and lungs that this exercise provides.

    How To Practice

    1. To begin, maintain a straight posture similar to Tadasana.
    2. Ideally, the arms should be situated on either side of the body and parallel to one another.
    3. Slowly raise the arms in a direction that is parallel to the ceiling.
    4. Palms should be raised over your head and facing each other, in addition to the arms.
    5. Keep your arms straight at all times!
    6. Take a look up similar to salute from the top of the head.

    Chair Pose (Utkatasana)

    Chair Pose (Utkatasana)

    Your calves and ankles will be strengthened while your thighs, hips and spine will be stretched in the Chair Pose (Utkatasana). Also, it can help with flat feet and energise the heart, abdominal organs, and diaphragm.

    How To Practice

    1. To make your legs stronger, imagine squeezing them together as if they were one solid piece of metal. To practise, roll up a towel or a block into a tight ball and squeeze it as hard as you can, then shoot it out behind you while doing an internal thigh rotation.
    2. If you need to, you can widen your feet apart to strengthen your basis.
    3. Lift your upper body higher by applying strong pressure to the soles of your feet. Make sure your weight is equally distributed between your heels and the balls of your feet.
    4. Hands-on training with a (steady) chair can help you get comfortable with the leg movement.

    Knees Bend Version of Boat Pose (Paripurna Navasana)

    Knees Bend Version of Boat Pose (Paripurna Navasana)

    It relieves stress and functions as a stress reliever. It also enhances your capacity to concentrate and promotes stability.

    How To Practice

    1. A knee-bent variant of the boat position known as Paripurna navasana
    2. Bend your knees and place your feet firmly on the floor. 
    3. As you inhale, place your hands behind your knees and lift your chest.
    4. Draw your lower tummy in and up while engaging your inner thighs.
    5. Lift your feet to around knee height with your toes spread wide and lean back in your chair.
    6. Inhale and lower your arms to the ground.
    7. Straighten your legs to move further.
    8. Stay for two to five breaths, then work up to ten.
    9. To exit the position, exhale and lower your feet to the floor. Sit with a straight spine and hold onto your legs for a few breaths before releasing them.

    Extended Side Angle Pose (Utthita Parsvakonasana) 

    Extended Side Angle Pose (Utthita Parsvakonasana) 

    This pose is best done around the start or midway of a standing pose series. It prepares the body for deeper leg and groyne stretches like Bound Angle Pose (Baddha Konasana) and Wide-Angle Seated Forward Fold (Upavistha Konasana).

    How To Practice

    1. Take a deep breath and hold Tadasana for a few breaths. Take a big step from the right foot to the long side of the mat while keeping your hands on your hips (right side).
    2. The pelvis should open toward the front as a result of turning your right foot out at 90 degrees and bringing your left foot in the same manner at a 45-degree angle.
    3. Gently exhale while bending your right knee to 90 degrees and descending your trunk slowly. Make sure your thighs are parallel to the ground at all times. To work your quadriceps, simply raise your kneecaps up towards your thighs.
    4. Deepen your breaths here.
    5. Using an exhalation, lower yourself onto a right leg while extending the crown of your head to the side. Reach down with your right hand and place it inside or outside of your right foot at the same time (wherever you feel comfortable reaching down).
    6. Put your left hand over your head, palm down, and parallel to your left ear.
    7. Take a deep breath in and out as you stretch from the fingers of your left hand to the side ribs and then to the waist and finally to the outer side of the left heel.
    8. As long as your neck is strong enough, you can glance up from beneath your left armpit to the ceiling from there.
    9. Hold the final pose for a few deep breaths. Keep inhaling and exhaling deeply.
    10. Straighten your body by pressing your feet firmly to the ground and lowering the left arm to your thigh.
    11. Reverse the orientation of your feet, and do the same pose on the other side of the mat (left).

    Thunderbolt Pose (Vajrasana)

    Thunderbolt Pose (Vajrasana)

    Hypertension can be reduced with the use of this pose, which targets the lower abdominal muscles and their function. Obesity is also reduced as a result of increased blood flow.

    How To Practice

    1. Take a seat with your feet together in front of you, with your knees bent.
    2. Sit in a kneeling position, with your legs folded in front of you. In order to keep the hips on the heels, keep the toes pointed out behind you, and your big toes should contact at the rear of your feet.
    3. Keep a cushion under your feet for comfort and to prevent ankle strain if you are a beginner.
    4. Alternatively, if you suffer from knee pain, you might place a cushion or blanket between your feet and knees. Keep in mind that you may need to see your doctor if you have any medical conditions.
    5. Sit down in the pit created by your split heels and enjoy your time.
    6. Your head, neck and spine should all be in a straight line. Put your hands on your thighs with the palms facing up.
    7. Consider holding this pose for roughly 15 minutes if you are an advanced yoga practitioner. Begin with roughly 30 seconds and work your way up as you feel comfortable.
    8. Breathe out and straighten your legs.

    Extended Triangle Pose (Utthita Trikonasana)

    Extended Triangle Pose (Utthita Trikonasana)

    Regular practice of this asana draws energy stored in the tailbone, a vital and strong source. When under stress, this is especially beneficial for those who require more energy to work efficiently.

    How To Practice

    1. To begin, stand with your feet wider than hip-width apart. Try to extend your legs as far as you possibly can. Keep your elbows and forearms parallel to the ground as you extend them. At this stage, your palms should be facing down.
    2. Starting from your right side, you should place your right foot at a 90-degree angle and your left foot at a 45-degree angle for the exercise.
    3. After inhaling for a few seconds and then gently exhaling, bend your body to the right side and to the right heel. Waistlines should be kept as long as possible.
    4. Next, put your right hand next to your right foot and grab your right ankle. For a few seconds, stretch your left hand straight above your shoulders while doing this.
    5. Finally, with your shoulders aligned, raise your head to gaze upwards. Release the stretch after a few seconds of holding this position. Then, wait a few seconds before repeating the asana on the opposite side of the body.

    Easy Pose (Sukhasana)

    Easy Pose (Sukhasana)

    This meditation pose relaxes and harmonises body and mind. As your body and mind become more in harmony, it can help lower your blood pressure.

    How To Practice

    1. Stretch your legs out on a mat and take a deep breath.
    2. You may do this by bending one of your legs and placing it beneath the other thigh.
    3. Bend the other leg in the same way and insert it under the folded one.
    4. Maintain a straight back, neck, and torso while sitting upright.
    5. The hands should be placed on the thighs in the Chin Mudra or Jnana Mudra.
    6. Keep the straight line of your head, neck, and trunk intact by tilting your head and chin a bit toward the chest.
    7. Close your eyes or focus on the tip of your nose if you like.
    8. In between the brows, focus your thoughts on the task at hand.

    Tree pose (Vrksasana)

    Tree pose (Vrksasana)

    This meditation pose is also good for controlling low blood pressure.

    How To Practice

    1. Take a few breaths and settle into Tadasana. Firm your calf muscles by spreading your toes and pressing them into the mat. Gently elevate your lower tummy by raising your front hips so that they point toward your lower ribs.
    2. Breathe in, elevating your chest; exhale, drawing your shoulders backward. Keep your gaze fixed on a single point in the dipose.
    3. Raise your right foot up onto your left thigh or shin with your hands on your hips. Attempt to avoid a collision with the knee.
    4. Make a fist with your right foot and your left leg.
    5. Your pelvis should be level and centred in front of you at all times.
    6. Using Anjali Mudra or branching out like a tree, lay your hands at your heart or extend your arms out like branches seeking for the sun.
    7. Afterwards, return to Mountain Pose and repeat on the opposite side.

    Corpse Pose (Savasana)

    Corpse Pose (Savasana)

    A natural way to relieve stress, depression, and exhaustion. It aids in the preparation of the body for a good night’s sleep. It also helps to increase blood flow.

    How To Practice

    1. The first step is to lie down on your back on the floor, flat on your back. Keeping a space of one foot between your legs is recommended. Keep your hands open, palms facing up, and a few inches away from your thighs during this exercise.
    2. As you begin to softly close your eyes and relax your entire body, remember to keep your neck straight.
    3. Followed by 5 or 6 calm, deep breaths, gently yet steadily. Try to picture yourself in a calm, stress-free state by visualising every area of your body with a sense of resolution.

    Garland Pose (Malasana)

    Garland Pose (Malasana)

    Malasana (Garland Pose) stretches the waist, ankles, and back while conditioning the tummy.

    How To Practice

    1. To begin, stand in Mountain Pose (Tadasana) with your arms at your sides at the very top of your mat. You want to take a step that is roughly the same width as the mat under your feet.
    2. Squat down by bending your knees and lowering your hips. Thighs should be separated from the rest of the body, but keep the dipose between your feet to a minimum. If your heels start to sag, use a folded mat or blanket to keep them in place.
    3. Position yourself so that you’re leaning slightly forward and bringing both arms in close to the inner of each knee. Inhale and exhale, keeping your elbows pressed against the inner of your knees (Anjali Mudra). Try to get your hands and forearms in a straight line with the floor.
    4. Straighten your spine and relax your shoulders as you lift and stretch your body. Make a modest heel-to-toe shift.
    5. Hold for five deep breaths. Make a fist-sized release with your fingertips on the ground. After that, carefully extend your legs into a Standing Forward Fold (upward dog) (Uttanasana).

    One-Legged Frog Pose (Eka Pada Bhekasana)

    One-Legged Frog Pose (Eka Pada Bhekasana)

    The Half Frog Pose is an energetic as well as heart-opening pose. This increases blood flow and allows for deeper breathing.

    How To Practice

    1. Raise your elbows while lying on your stomach.
    2. Grasp the top of your right foot with your right hand while bending your right leg.
    3. When performing this exercise, your left hand should be parallel to your body and flat on the mat.
    4. You should place your thumb on the outside of your right hand, pointing away from you.
    5. As you stretch your thigh, gently press down on the foot.
    6. Maintain a straight spine.
    7. Continue to deepen the stretch, holding the pose as long as you can.
    8. Repeat with the opposite leg.

    One-Legged King Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana)

    One-Legged King Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana)

    Eka Pada Rajakapotasana is a deep hip opening and forward bend that should be approached with awareness to receive the many benefits.

    How To Practice

    1. Begin with Cat Stretch (Marjariasana).
    2. Draw your right leg forward and place it on your right wrist as you exhale.
    3. Bend your knee and move your ankle close to your groin area while maintaining a straight back. To do this, bring the right foot all the way to the left hand and let it rest on the wrist there.
    4. The left leg should be slid back to the floor. Maintaining a straight knee, keep the front of the foot on the ground and the sole facing the ceiling while keeping the knee bent.
    5. To stretch your lower back, place your right buttock on the floor and push your tailbone forward.
    6. Pushing your fingertips all the way to the floor can help strengthen your lower back even more.
    7. While in this position, take a few deep breaths to relax.
    8. Return to the Cat Stretch by sliding your left knee forward while inhaling while holding the support of your hands.
    9. Make sure you take a few deep breaths and repeat the process with the second leg before releasing.

    Lying Down Bound Angle Pose (Supta Baddha Konasana)

    Lying Down Bound Angle Pose (Supta Baddha Konasana)

    This yoga practise, Supta Baddha Konasana (Reclined Bound Angle Pose), is an excellent way to alleviate tension and alleviate anxiety levels.

    How To Practice

    1. The first step is to sit in dandasana, which means to sit with your spine upright and legs extended, feet touching and toes pointed upward.
    2. Bring your feet closer to your pelvis by bending your knees. Your legs should form a diamond shape with the soles of your feet touching.
    3. Grab hold of your feet with your arms. Place your hands behind your feet to provide support, and try to bring your heels as close to your genitals as you can manage them.
    4. Gently inhale and gently raise the chest and spine with each exhalation.
    5. If you’re ready, you can lie on your back on the floor and relax. You can rest your arms on the inside of your thighs.
    6. Relax your muscles and inhale deeply for 5 to 10 breaths as you remain in this pose.
    7. You can either stretch your legs and take a few deep breaths to make your way out. Gently raise yourself to a standing position by rolling onto your right side and using your hands.

    Locust pose (Salambhasana)

    Locust pose (Salambhasana)

    The Full Locust Pose aids scoliosis, kyphosis, and spondylosis (a disease of the intervertebral discs). This pose also expands the chest, strengthens the lungs, and lowers blood pressure.

    How To Practice

    1. Lie on your stomach on the floor and keep your arms at your side.
    2. As you inhale, raise your upper body and legs.
    3. Keep your knees straight while trying to lift your legs high.
    4. With your palms towards the ground and your arms resting on either side of your body, you are in the correct position.
    5. Make sure your lower ribs, pelvis, and belly are supported by your weight.
    6. Aim for a few deep breaths in Salabhasana pose, then lower yourself to the floor.
    7. Finally, return to your starting position and continue this posture for two to three repetitions.

    Extended big toe pose (Utthita hasta padangusthasana)

    Extended big toe pose (Utthita hasta padangusthasana)

    It has the ability to lower high blood pressure or hypertension. It has the potential to prevent osteoporosis since it strengthens the bones.

    How To Practice

    1. Take a few deep breaths in simple Tadasana pose, then release from Parivrtta Utkatasana and come to a standing position.
    2. While taking a deep breath in, bend your right knee and grab your right toe with your right hand. Then, while taking a deep breath out, extend your right leg and arm straight out in front of you, and bring your weight to your left side of the body on your left foot.
    3. These muscles and the nerves are both stretched out and kept active in this asana, Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana, which is a hamstring stretch.
    4. In this pose, the sciatic nerve may be felt from the hip down to the tip of the foot, since it runs from the lower back to the foot.
    5. Stay here for around six breaths, or as long as you feel comfortable, and as you exhale, move your foot out more to feel the hips flexing.

    Staff Pose (Dandasana

    Staff Pose (Dandasana) 

    It is beneficial to practise this pose combined with breathing exercises to help relax the mind and relieve tension and anxiety, as well as to improve your overall health.

    How To Practice

    1. Begin by sitting with your legs out in front of you, elongating your spine.
    2. Straighten your arms and place them beside your hips.
    3. Touch your big toes and keep a slight gap between your heels.
    4. Your toes should be pointed back when you flex your ankles.
    5. With your big toe mounds, continue forward movement. Use your femurs to press down while rotating your inner thighs in and out.
    6. Take the time to widen your collarbones and extend your sternum.
    7. Draw your upper arms back and relax your front ribs while doing this.
    8. To exit the pose, let go of your arms and legs.

    Reclining Hand-to-Big-Toe Pose I (Supta Padangusthasana)

    Reclining Hand-to-Big-Toe Pose I (Supta Padangusthasana)

    With adequate breathing and contraction of the lower abdominal muscles, Supta Padangusthasana helps alleviate diseases including high blood pressure, promote female fertility, and treat indigestion.

    How To Practice

    1. Lie on your back with your legs extended, breathing slowly and deeply.
    2. Hug your right leg close to your chest while bending your right knee.
    3. Put a yoga strap around the right foot’s ball.. and tighten it. Using two hands, grasp the ends of the strap. If you don’t already have one, a belt will do the trick in your absence.
    4. As you straighten your right leg, keep the strap around your ankle. To do this, keep your right leg straight and your right foot flexed while you raise your right leg up to your right shoulder. Your left foot should be flexed and your left leg should be pushed toward the floor at all times.
    5. To get a different kind of stretch, try pointing your right toes. If you like, you can alternate between flexed and pointed feet.
    6. For five to ten breaths, keep your leg raised.
    7. Come out with your right knee tucked back into your chest, left knee joining it, and then left leg lifted in front of you. Stretch both of your legs separately.

    Bound Angle Pose (Baddha Konasana)

    Bound Angle Pose (Baddha Konasana)

    Baddha Konasana can decrease blood pressure by increasing circulation. It extends your inner thighs, knees, and groins.

    How To Practice

    1. Stretch your legs wide as you relax. Keep your torso, neck, and head in a straight line at all times. Slow your breaths.
    2. Let out a sigh. Kneel on the floor with your knees bent. Sole-to-sole contact should be made between your feet. They should be held and moved towards the pelvis. Let your knees fall to the ground.
    3. Adjust your pelvic and pubic bones so that they are all seated equally. Keep your torso in a straight line with your neck and the backside of your head by keeping your shoulders back and upright.
    4. The tip of the nose should be the only thing you’re looking at. The place between your eyebrows is a good place to start. Maintain your position for as long as you’d like.

    Big Toe Pose (Padangusthasana)

    Big Toe Pose (Padangusthasana)

    This pose is beneficial for calming the mind and improving concentration. It has the ability to lower high blood pressure or hypertension.

    How To Practice

    1. To begin, stand tall and place your hands to one side.
    2. You should keep your feet around hip-width apart during this exercise.
    3. Stretch your arms out in front of you and inhale.
    4. Bend your torso toward your feet as you exhale.
    5. Fingers on toes, please.
    6. Maintain this pose for at least a half-hour or so.
    7. Lift your limbs as you inhale and exhale slowly. Keep your legs and elbows straight while you do this.
    8. This is a one-time use of the phrase. At least 8-10 repetitions can be done every time you exercise.

    Fire Log Pose (Agnistambhasana)

    Fire Log Pose (Agnistambhasana)

    It opens the hips and regulates the breath. It raises Agni, as the name implies (In Vedas Agni is also referred to as the fuel of the soul and body). After a hard day at work, this pose might help relieve stress and anxiety.

    How To Practice

    1. From a seated position, slide the right foot forward until it is directly below the left knee, balancing it on the left foot or ankle. If your knees are hurting, don’t do this pose.
    2. As you inhale, lower your hips towards the floor and raise your head towards the ceiling. Bring the chest toward the front by bringing the shoulders back and down. To widen the hips, slowly relax the knees toward the floor.
    3. As you exhale, slowly extend your torso forward as far as you can while keeping your back flat and your chest wide. Either hold onto the knees or walk your hands forward. Allow your chin to rest on the floor if at all possible.
    4. Breathe in and hold for two to six deep breaths, then release.
    5. Repeat the inhalation on the other side, taking it slowly and steadily all the way up.

    Cow face pose (Gomukhasana)

    Cow face pose (Gomukhasana)

    Gomukhasana is a great technique to de-stress. Blood pressure and heart rate are the basic signs of stress. Yoga’s steady, repetitive breathing technique helps to quiet the mind.

    How To Practice

    1. Straighten your back and your legs in front of you as you sit on the yoga mat for this pose. To begin, stand with both feet together and hands on your hips.
    2. Keeping your left buttock pressed against the right foot, bend your right leg.
    3. Your left knee should be stacked on top of your right knee.
    4. Bend the elbow of your left arm as you raise it above your head. The right arm should be brought behind your back and interlocked with the left hand simultaneously.
    5. Breathe deeply and comfortably for as long as you need to in the ujjayi position.
    6. Let go of your arms as you exhale.
    7. Continue to uncross your legs and repeat the process with the second leg.

    Mountain pose (Tadasana)

    Mountain pose (Tadasana)

    Yoga includes both movement and meditation. This pose opens your mind and connects you to your inner consciousness. You will have an increased sense of alertness, calmness, and serenity.

    How To Practice

    1. Lie down on the yoga mat with your knees slightly bent and your feet slightly apart.
    2. Make sure your hands are by your side at all times.
    3. Raising your arms gently, inhale deeply as you interlock your fingers.
    4. You can do this while standing on your toes and slowly raising your heels.
    5. The best way to stretch your body is to keep your head up and gaze about.
    6. Shoulders, chest, arms, and whole weight should be on your toes while you stretch.
    7. Holding this pose for a long period of time is required.
    8. Continue exhaling deeply as you return to the beginning posture.

    Conclusion

    Yoga is a remedy that is quite effective in the treatment of high blood pressure. Yoga reduces blood pressure in a modest but significant way. In addition to reducing stress, yoga positions can lower blood pressure. Your heart’s efficiency will be improved as well. Yoga has a great effect on both the mind and the body. Using this method, people can significantly reduce the level of hypertension in their body.

    Studies have shown that yoga treatment can be therapeutic with a major impact on SBP and DBP, when practised for a longer duration, it has also shown to be useful for lowering lipid profiles. Other several studies have shown a statistically significant decrease in blood pressure, showing the beneficial effects of yoga on blood pressure. In the future, investigations using a structured yoga dosage will be required.

    References and Further Reading

    1. Lawes, C. M., Vander Hoorn, S., Law, M. R., Elliott, P. A. U. L., MacMahon, S., & Rodgers, A. (2004). High blood pressure. Comparative quantification of health risks: global and regional burden of disease attributable to selected major risk factors. Geneva: World Health Organization, 281-390.
    2. Master, A. M., Dublin, L. I., & Marks, H. H. (1950). The normal blood pressure range and its clinical implications. Journal of the American Medical Association143(17), 1464-1470.
    3. Din-Dzietham, R., Liu, Y., Bielo, M. V., & Shamsa, F. (2007). High blood pressure trends in children and adolescents in national surveys, 1963 to 2002. Circulation116(13), 1488-1496.
    4. Patel, C. (1975). Yoga and biofeedback in the management of hypertension. Journal of Psychosomatic Research.
    5. Jerusha Santa Packyanathan, S. P. (2020). Comparison of the effect of Yoga, Zumba and Aerobics in controlling blood pressure in the Indian population. Journal of family medicine and primary care9(2), 547.
    6. Permana, B., Lindayani, L., Hendra, A., & Juniarni, L. (2020). The Effect of Yoga Exercise on Reducing Blood Pressure among Elderly with Hypertension: A systematic review. Jurnal Pendidikan Keperawatan Indonesia6(2), 163-170.
    7. Damodaran, A., Malathi, A., Patil, N., Shah, N., & Marathe, S. (2002). Therapeutic potential of yoga practices in modifying cardiovascular risk profile in middle aged men and women. The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India50(5), 633-640.
    8. Cade, W. T., Reeds, D. N., Mondy, K. E., Overton, E. T., Grassino, J., Tucker, S., … & Yarasheski, K. (2010). Yoga lifestyle intervention reduces blood pressure in HIV‐infected adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors. HIV medicine11(6), 379-388.
    9. Satyanarayana, P., Vijaya Benerji, G., Rekha Kumari, D., Meka, F. B., & Kummari, N. R. (2013). Effect of yoga on heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index. J Dent Med Sci8, 36-9.
    10. Cowen, V. S., & Adams, T. B. (2005). Physical and perceptual benefits of yoga asana practice: results of a pilot study. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies9(3), 211-219.
    11. Goldstein, C. M., Josephson, R., Xie, S., & Hughes, J. W. (2012). Current perspectives on the use of meditation to reduce blood pressure. International journal of hypertension, 2012.
    12. Bhavanani, A. B., & Sanjay, Z. (2011). Immediate effect of sukha pranayama on cardiovascular variables in patients of hypertension. International journal of yoga therapy21(1), 73-76.

    Author

    Neha
    Neha

    I am a food technologist. I cherish working on interesting topics and will be ready to take the challenge into sharp output. I like to study and learn while working. My work describes me. Good content allows me to talk with people without speaking a word.

    Neha has authored the following key articles on the World Yoga Forum.
    Top 50 Yoga Poses, Breathing Exercises and Benefits
    Mindfulness
    Yoga for Anxiety
    Yoga For Back Pain
    Yoga For Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    Yoga For Better Digestion
    Yoga For Depression
    Yoga For Osteoporosis
    Yoga For Pregnancy
    Yoga for Menstruation 
    Yoga For Menopause

    Leave a Reply

    %d bloggers like this: